Science Frontiers
The Unusual & Unexplained

Strange Science * Bizarre Biophysics * Anomalous astronomy
From the pages of the World's Scientific Journals

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About Science Frontiers

Science Frontiers is the bimonthly newsletter providing digests of reports that describe scientific anomalies; that is, those observations and facts that challenge prevailing scientific paradigms. Over 2000 Science Frontiers digests have been published since 1976.

These 2,000+ digests represent only the tip of the proverbial iceberg. The Sourcebook Project, which publishes Science Frontiers, also publishes the Catalog of Anomalies, which delves far more deeply into anomalistics and now extends to sixteen volumes, and covers dozens of disciplines.

Over 14,000 volumes of science journals, including all issues of Nature and Science have been examined for reports on anomalies. In this context, the newsletter Science Frontiers is the appetizer and the Catalog of Anomalies is the main course.


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Subscriptions to the Science Frontiers newsletter are no longer available.

Compilations of back issues can be found in Science Frontiers: The Book, and original and more detailed reports in the The Sourcebook Project series of books.


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Please note that the publisher has now closed, and can not be contacted.

 

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Search results for: sweet potatoes

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... , no. 61, p. 27, February-March 1992.) Comment. The Bayeux Tapestry turkey, in particular, questionable. In fact, a careful search has not found it! See: SF#103. An archeological hot potato! Mangaia is a small volcanic island in the Cook Island group. During the excavation of a rock shelter on this island, large fragments of sweet potato were discovered. These were subsequently carbondated at about 1000 AD. "The prehistoric transferral of this South American domesticate into Polynesia obviously raises issues of cultural contact between the coast of South America and the Polynesian Islands. In our view, the most likely transferrors would have been the seafaring Polynesians, on a voyage of exploration to South America and return." (Hather, Jon, and ... sketch is reputed to be from the Bayeux Tapestry, which dates back to 1066-1077. (Anonymous; "Talking Turkey," Fortean Times, no. 61, p. 27, February-March 1992.) Comment. The Bayeux Tapestry turkey, in particular, questionable. In fact, a careful search has not found it! See: SF#103. An archeological hot potato! Mangaia is a small volcanic island in the Cook Island group. During the excavation of a rock shelter on this island, large fragments of sweet potato were discovered. These were subsequently carbondated at about 1000 AD. "The prehistoric transferral of this South American domesticate into Polynesia obviously raises issues of cultural contact between the coast of South America and the Polynesian Islands. In our view, the ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 62  -  15 May 2017  -  URL: /sf081/sf081a02.htm
... noted geographer, summarizes the botanical evidence for early transoceanic voyages. Domestic cotton. Thousands of years old in the Americas; believed to be a hybrid between New World wild cotton and species from southwest Africa. Bottle gourds. Of African origin but known in Peru about 11,000 years ago; dispersible by ocean currents but appeared in Peru only after humans learned how to navigate on the oceans. Sweet potatoes. A New World plant that has been known in Polynesia for at least 500 years; but the South American name for the sweet potato (kumara) turns out to be a Sanskrit word from India, which is most perplexing. Coconuts. Arrived in the Americas from the Indian Ocean region via Polynesia; can be dispersed by ocean currents, but this long eastward voyage would have been ... to many currents. Peanuts. Well-established on the Peruvian coast thousands of years ago, but the same variety was known in preShang China before 1500 BC. (Carter, George F.; "Kilmer's Law: Plant Evidence of Early Voyages," Oceans, 12:8 , 1979.) Reference. Our Handbook Ancient Man contains much more evidence for Precolumbian contacts with the New World. Information on this large volume is located at: here . From Science Frontiers #9 , Winter 1979 . 1979-2000 William R. Corliss ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 54  -  15 May 2017  -  URL: /sf009/sf009p02.htm
... Oceania Maize in Old World Potatoes in Oceania Old World Shells in New World Cocaine, Tobacco, Other Drugs in Old World Oceania in New World Old World Cotton in New World Precolumbian Horses New World Shells in Old World Old World Chickens in New World Early Agriculture Easter Island Decline: Plant Evidence Sunflowers in Old World New World Hybrid Cotton Cowry Shell Diffusion Dyes, Diffusion of Coconut, Bottle Gourd, Sweet Potato Diffusion MG GRAPHIC ARTIFACTS MGC COINS IN UNEXPECTED PLACES Egyptian in Australia Egyptian in Martinique Roman in North America Roman in Iceland Chinese in North America Carthaginian in United Kingdom Hebrew in North America Coins in Coal Deposits Phoenician in Bahamas MGG GEOFORMS Effigy Mounds, Emblematic Mounds Boulder Mosaics Serpent Mounds, Wide Distribution Blythe Ground Figures British Hill Figures Nazca Lines Gravel Effigies Santa Valley Geoglyphs Georgia Eagle Mound Australian Ground ... Ancient Catastrophes Reports of Welsh Indians Blacks in New World [MAA] Legends of Cherokee Pygmies [MAA] Pre-Polynesians on Easter Island Precolumbian Whites on Northwest Coast Legends of Giants Pygmy Reports [MAA] Eden Story Maori-Origin Legends South Americans on Easter Island Prehistoric Whites in West Virginia MAP PLANTS, ANIMALS, DISEASES Elephantitis in Polynesia Diffusion of Plants and Animals throughout Oceania Maize in Old World Potatoes in Oceania Old World Shells in New World Cocaine, Tobacco, Other Drugs in Old World Oceania in New World Old World Cotton in New World Precolumbian Horses New World Shells in Old World Old World Chickens in New World Early Agriculture Easter Island Decline: Plant Evidence Sunflowers in Old World New World Hybrid Cotton Cowry Shell Diffusion Dyes, Diffusion of Coconut, Bottle Gourd, Sweet Potato Diffusion MG GRAPHIC ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 17  -  15 May 2017  -  URL: /cat-arch.htm
... valued as fertility symbols and may not have been consumed as food. The pre-Columbian Pacific was a twoway conduit for plants and even a few animals. For example, the Old World contributed black-boned chickens, cotton, and coconuts to the New World. As for China, Johannessen has gathered evidence for early Chinadestined Pacific crossings of maize, sunflowers, a squash, chili peppers, sweet potatoes, the yambean, and grain amaranths. Most startling, though, has been the discovery of New World peanuts at two Neolithic sites in eastern China. The associated dates are astounding: 2,400 BC and 4,400 BC. Who was sailing the wide Pacific while the Egyptian pyramids and Stonehenge were under construction? Supporting the fossil peanuts is a written Chinese record of 300 AD ... a plant that buries its flowers in the soil and makes seeds that rattle when dry. Peanuts are very unusual that they flower above ground and then burrow into the ground to form nuts -- a characteristic one must see to believe and a story hard to fabricate. (Johannessen, Carl L.; "American Crop Plants in Asia before A.D . 1500," Pre Columbiana , 1:9 , 1998.) From Science Frontiers #125, SEP-OCT 1999 . 1999-2000 William R. Corliss ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 26  -  15 May 2017  -  URL: /sf125/sf125p01.htm

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